Stories about: hypoplastic left heart syndrome

Idaho mom goes the distance to help teen with scoliosis

aaron and family
“You want a hospital with the best technology and the best nurses and doctors in the country. You expect that, and you expect it to be clean. Boston Children’s has all of that,” says Lisa Findlay, a mom from Hayden, Idaho.

“What made the difference was how much everyone loves these kids. Everyone who walked into Aaron’s room, from the surgeons to nurses’ aides to janitors and child life specialists, was on a mission to help Aaron.”

From the time he was born, Aaron encountered one medical challenge after another.

He was born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a serious congenital heart defect. By the time he was three years old, Aaron had undergone three surgeries, suffered a stroke and was diagnosed with Factor V Leiden, a blood clot disorder. The stroke left him confined to a wheelchair and caused cognitive impairment. Aaron also developed severe scoliosis.

By age 16, he was a veteran of children’s hospitals from Washington to Texas.

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Life with HLHS: Keeping up with Lucas

Baird-boys-3By Rebekah McGowan

When we first learned that our son would be born with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome, we were devastated. But once the shock had worn off we were desperate to talk to other families who had been through the experience. We asked our doctor about support groups, but he was less than impressed with what was available.

“They’re out there, but it’s mostly propaganda,” he said, scrolling through a Google search of HLHS communities. “Regardless of what you may read, these kids can’t run and they can’t do sports.”

And while he wasn’t impressed with what Google had to say about the future of kids with HLHS, he was impressed with what Boston Children’s Hospital’s Heart Center could do for children with the condition—and I’m so glad he was. Through his referral we went to Boston, and there we found the hope we needed. It was there that we learned that our son had a good chance of having an extraordinary quality of life under their care. We were also told that other than contact sports, our son could do anything he wanted to.

Over the years Lucas continued to thrive. And for each year he got stronger we participated in the NSTAR walk for Boston Children’s Hospital. It’s our way to say thank you to the hospital that saved him, and to help fund additional research, particularly in the areas of congenital heart defects that affect 1 in 100 babies born every year.

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Determined to overcome HLHS

Peter-Dunn-3 Kerri Dunn can always tell when her son Peter is determined to do something because when he gets deeply focused his face scrunches up and he squints one eye tightly shut, which his mother says makes him look like a cute, 2-year-old version of Popeye.

It’s a face Kerri sees a lot, because Peter is a very determined little boy. The youngest of six children, Peter is always trying to keep up with his older brothers and sisters—or “my kids” as he calls them. And, despite his smaller size, he still manages to do so—whether they’re walking, running or even climbing trees.

While his determination to keep pace with his older siblings may seem cute on the surface, it’s actually an incredible testament to Peter’s strong will. Not only is he managing to follow in their much larger footsteps, he’s doing so with only fifty percent of a working heart beating inside his chest.

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Connected by little hearts

Jeffrey as an infant

When Jeffrey Cameron was born in 1996, he seemed to be a perfectly healthy baby. Then, at just ten days old, baby Jeffrey went into acute respiratory distress and was taken by air ambulance to a local children’s hospital where he was diagnosed with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS), meaning the left side of his heart was underdeveloped and couldn’t pump blood properly.

After a dizzying round of meetings with doctors, Jeffrey’s parents, Lenore and Tim, were presented with a set of difficult choices: Jeffrey could have a heart transplant, undergo a series of three open heart surgeries, or they could let him die at home.

“The doctors outlined our choices for us, and their exact words were, ‘You have three options and they’re all not very good,’” Lenore says. “We were told that transplant hearts for infants were extremely hard to come by and the that the 3-staged surgery was experimental. They said even if Jeffrey lived he might not have any real quality of life after all the surgeries.”

Based on the information presented to them by doctors, Lenore and her husband were under the impression that there was little hope for Jeffrey. After agonizing over the decision, the Cameron’s brought Jeffrey home with them so the family could enjoy what little time they had together in the comfort of their own house. It was a devastating time for them, but as the days wore on and Jeffrey continued to fight, friends and family asked the grieving couple to consider getting a second opinion. They began researching other treatment centers and learned that Children’s Hospital Boston had been successfully treating HLHS since the early 1980s, and patients with the condition were routinely sent there from all over the world.

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